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Calibration Bias
Please see "biases."
 
Calibration Meeting

A “calibration meeting” brings together managers (who are peers) to finalize ratings of all salaried employees within their groups. 


During these meetings, employees’ individual results are comprehensively calibrated against their peer groupand evaluated on defined criteria that include performance relative to objectives, job-scope delivery, demonstration of leadership competencies, living the company’s values, and personal development.
 
Candidate Pools

"Candidate pools" are generated from the process of engaging and grouping candidates by interest level, background, skills, and experiences.

 
Candidates
A "candidate" is the prospective person seeking or being sought for a position or role within a company.
 
Capability
A "capability" is a higher-level and more holistic attribute that concerns the capacity to use one’s competence in novel situations. This difference in terminology implies that competencies are static sets of knowledge and skills. Capabilities, by contrast, require that knowledge and skills be built upon through additional learning. While these distinctions may seem academic, their implications are not. Competencies are measurable today, whereas capabilities are what the individual could do in the future in a novel situation.
 
Capability Augmentation

“Capability augmentation” (as it pertains to change management) refers to the training or retraining of existing employees, and / or the addition of new staff members (whether as employees, consultants, or contingent workers) based on the results of a gap analysis.

 
Capability Development
“Capability development” describes the integrated concepts of talent development, performance-driven learning, and operational training.
 
Capability Gap
A “capability gap” is the difference between an issue’s importance and an organization’s readiness to address it.
 
Capability Gap Analysis

A “capability gap analysis” (as it pertains to change management) helps to identify the gap between the current and desired capabilities of individuals and groups affected by a given change in an organization. This type of analysis provides a high-level view and occurs early in change readiness planning. Its primary purpose is to pinpoint potential issues, so that the project plan can be adjusted accordingly. It can also form the foundation for creating more detailed training and hiring plans that will be developed in later phases of a change initiative.

 

Iterative in nature, a capability gap analysis should be updated throughout the planning and execution phases of the change project. As decisions are made and the impacts on other functions and stakeholders continually assessed, further clarity is gained on the actions needed to close current capability gaps.

 

A four-step process (see graphic below), a capability gap analysis helps an organization to understand and quantify the gap that exists between its present state and its desired future state. By analyzing these differences, the organization can take actions to eliminate the capability gap and achieve the desired outcomes of the change initiative.

 

Bersin by Deloitte Recommended Reading:

 
Capability Management
“Capability management” describes the integrated concepts of talent development, performance-driven learning, and operational training.